FAREWELL AZEDDIN ALAIA

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This issue of TTT Lalehzar pays tribute to the late French-Tunisian designer Azzedin Alaia who took his own time designing his collections with little to no regards to publicity. His values lied elsewhere; He said he never thought about doing new things or being creative. He much rather cared about creating clothing that make women beautiful. Thus, catering to the core of what women look for in clothing. This rendered his gowns simple yet classy, making his collections timeless.
He wasn’t interested in conforming to conventional fashion calendars and hosted his fashion shows in Paris at a time he himself desired, regardless of the fashion crowds being in the city or not. This rebellion towards the calendar made his designs more desirable in a way.

Alaia was born in 1940 to a farming family in Tunisia and studied sculpture at École des Beaux-Arts there. Later he would move to Paris in the 50s and work for fashion houses such as Dior and Guy Laroche before starting his solo journey as a designer. The world of fashion will forever honour and remember Alaia as an icon and in his own way a sculptor of the fashion industry. In the spirit of tribute, it made sense to introduce one of Alaia’s designs that conveys his ties to eastern lands through the use of islamic-like motifs. The Vienne Small Laser-cut Leather Tote is made of vibrant tomato red leather. The laser cut effect creates a central radial pattern reminiscent of elements seen in middle eastern architecture. The inside of a mosque’s dome perhaps, or in a far more abstract interpretation, a Persian rug. Positive and negative space go hand in hand to create this tote which paradoxically is also very simple in its complexity.

The cultural nostalgia this bag carries, alongside the vibrant red which is known to be a popular colour among easterners due to the compliments it pays to their complexion, is enough to tempt the Iranian woman to add this piece of accessory to her wardrobe. The accessory summarizes all of Alaia’s values in one product. A familiar motif with a detailed execution makes the bag a signature piece and a great accessory to cherish and remember him by.

unnamed-1 copy Mahtab Abghari  The Contemporary Woman Editor
Mahtab is studying Fashion Communication at Ryerson University, exploring cultural diversity and its influence on individuals. 
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